Defining the architectural space : rationalistic or intuitive way to architecture : monograph. Vol. 6 = Definiowanie przestrzeni architektonicznej : racjonalistyczna czy intuicyjna droga do architektury : monografia. Vol. 6

Type: Collection of book fragments
Title

Collection items (5)


Trusting intuition – the internal struggle of the designer in the process of creating architecture

Turbasa, Jakub
Fragment of a book
2018
Architecture is understood as one of the fields of art that requires knowledge, but also sensitivity and natural endowment. It combines two aspects: the rational and the intuitive. It is a constant struggle between two extremes: materiality and spirituality. Intuitions, understood as “considerations/explorations” (Latin intuitus), are born in association with reason and may accompany designers at three stages during the process of creating architecture: on-site visit (i.e. listening to “the sound” of a particular site; when apart from a rational analysis the first intuitions appear), in the act of designing, and during construction, when a real verification of earlier designing decisions takes place (including both rational and intuitive decisions) that may be accompanied by new intuitions. Trusting intuition, while also accompanying it with rational discernment, does not guarantee success. Masters may be fallible.

Monumental memories

Początko, Marek
Fragment of a book
2018
The condition of contemporary architecture allows one to ask: are monuments still needed? Do romantic visions of great architecture have their creators and recipients? The Italian architect Beniamino Servino, by creating drawings, restores and perhaps defines the idea of the monument anew. Colourful collages illustrate irrational forms that monumentalize architecture and landscape regardless of scale and context. Could the saved visions be not only an intuitive message but a rational need of contemporary architecture?

In search of architectural form patterns

Modrzewski, Bogusz
Fragment of a book
2018
The form language is part of the emerging idea of adaptive architectural design theory. The adaptive design combines the scientific basis of perception and definition of forms, with indicated possibilities of its creative application. This theory assumes certain invariants of form, or in other words – identified formal properties (which should not be taken for specific types, typologies, or styles) that may constitute features of adaptive architecture. They are independent of the time and context of particular architectural creations. So what are those specific properties of adaptive architecture? To what distinctive degree does the architectural object comply with the universal principles of design and this internal nature, expressed through the feelings of its users?

"Organisers of life" – rationality or intuition? A home as an example of a creative design attitude

Mikielewicz, Renata
Fragment of a book
2018
Designing poses an architect problems with the use of objective knowledge, investor’s wishes or in last place, his own intuition: a susceptibility to the location; an ability to use of the sensual perception, etc. Homes as architectural works are the buildings which are built most frequently. And here during the design process, perhaps strongest, the unique conflict between what is rational and what is intuitive arises. The article attempts to formulate an answer to the question how rationality or/and intuition stimulate the development process of the most intimate building – a human shelter.

Rationality and intuition – dialogical exchange between architects and building users

Lasiewicz-Sych, Angelika
Fragment of a book
2018
Inspired by the psychology of perception and research in social sciences, reflections on the meaning of dialogue – as a creative and turbulent exchange of ideas – in the creation of architecture. The axis of dialogue is conflict caused by various interpretations of architecture – as the implementation of abstract “concepts” (designers-creators) or as a world built of “physical things” and referring to specific life experiences (recipients). Both groups interested in architecture display rationalistic and intuitive attitudes, but these attitudes often lead them to different conclusions. The problem is particularly evident when the rationality of architects collides with the intuitive approach of the recipients or when the architect’s intuition hits the audience’s criticism raised on the basis of rational thinking.